Good morning, gamers.

::sips coffee::

Wanted to post some updates for the past week and a half’s games. Encounters is going along at a steady pace. We have about 8 to 12 people that show up each Wednesday, enough that we regularly need 2 DM’s. Thankfully we have enough DM’s in house that have experience with Encounters to handle the job. It’s really encouraging to me to see that Encounters is actually bringing people into the gaming store to play D&D. I think every week I’ve met a new gamer. This past week there were two new faces, as a dad in his late 30’s brought his 12 year old son to play. They sat at the table I was playing at and everything went fine. That was my first time playing D&D with a younger person and there weren’t any problems. Since the game is at the game store I think everyone tries to keep their language and such at a PG-13 level (or at least I do), in order to make the environment kid and family friendly, since that’s the type of place that I think the store owners want.

My Friday night game, Break the Iron Circle, had it’s second session this last Friday night and it went really well. The first session had the PC’s fight some brigands outside of town, save the farm woman and her sons, hook up with the resistance movement in the town and then ambush the brigands that were in the town bar. We actually got a decent amount of the story introduced in the first session, at least enough so that the players knew what the problem was in the area and why they should help. The two fights they had weren’t much of a challenge though.

The first fight was at a farmhouse and in fairly open terrain. The enemy consisted of 2 crossbowmen, 2 swordsmen and 2 wolves. It was a long fight, but none of the enemies had enough oomph to really put the hurt on a PC in a single hit, so the cleric was able to heal up the damage that the swordsmen were nickel and diming on the PC’s. The second fight was even less of a challenge. They knew the enemies would be in the bar, came up with a tactical plan and actually got it to work. It was simple, of course, (draw the enemies outside the bar where our ranger and mage can blast them), but the simplest plans like that are the best because they have the highest chance to actually work. So in the first round they had divided the enemies into two groups (minions outside, non-minions inside) and made quick work of all them. I think that fight took about 30 minutes, tops.

They took one of the brigands alive and that was where we ended the first session. The second session started with them taking the brigand back to the stables and interrogating him. The wizard cast his charm person equivalent and they proceeded to get a fair amount of information out of him before the ranger threw him off the second floor hayloft.

I had told them after the first session that I was going to beef up the encounters a little because of how easy they had handled the first two and they agreed that was a good idea (ha!). The next fight was going to be a caravan ambush, where the PC’s learned of an Iron Circle mage being escorted to the town to take over as mayor. They spent the night at their ambush site and waited for the stagecoach to arrive, having one of them lay down in the middle of the road wearing the colors of one of the dead brigands. Another simple plan. The stagecoach stopped while the guards got out and approached the half-0rc laying in the road, which was when the PC’s attacked.

Surprise rounds in 4th edition seem to be super deadly to me. I don’t know exactly why that is yet. Perhaps it has something to do with my first session in the dark sun game – we got ambushed 3 times in a row, and a surprise round against 1st level characters in dark sun is brutal.

The PC’s focused fire on the mage in the first round and got him bloodied. The rest of the combat was a grudge match. I had changed the standard brigand guards into Iron Circle Knights that had plate mail, heavy shields, warhammers, and the Knight’s Defensive Aura ability, as well as a Prone & Slowed effect on their at-will attack. There were 3 of them, the driver with a crossbow, and the mage. The Knights took a ton of punishment and they had an extra effect. If they dropped to 0 HP while within 5 squares of the mage, his necrotic aura kept them alive for one more action. In effect they gained Resist All: Infinite until after their next action, at which they dropped dead. I described the effect appropriately, I think, letting the PC’s know that the Knight should be dead by all rights, but there was strange, dark lights within his eyes and so on, etc.

The mage had some chain lightning that was reflavored as chain fire bursts that also healed the mage with siphoned life energy. In addition whenever a PC spent a healing surge within 5 squares of the mage he had an immediate power that would allow him to regain the same amount of HP. It didn’t stop the PC from healing, it just created a shadow duplicate of the healing energy that the cleric was sending to the PC, and the mage redirected the shadow duplicate to himself.

There was also a clockwork construct dog that I didn’t modify. It basically just guarded the mage but didn’t do a lot.

This fight was a challenge for the PC’s. While the ranger was able to skirmish and hang in the back, everyone else got at least a couple hits on them. I think 4 of the 7 PC’s were bloodied at some point and the PC Knight took a combined total of 80+ damage, having dropped to 0 HP twice during the fight. The cleric spent both his healing words and his Cure Light Wounds on the Knight and they both used their second wind. Even the PC mage (who was crucial in this fight) got knocked to 4 HP.

This tougher fight also showed me how the roles can really shine when they do what they are supposed to do. The PC Knight took a beating, but that was her job. The cleric was on the spot with healing, the ranger was away and skirmishing, the mage was blasting people and sliding them halfway across the battlefield, and the melee ranger and paladin were in the thick of it. I didn’t count but I’m pretty sure the fight used up about 40-50% of the PC’s resources for the day (healing surges, dailies, etc).

The end of the first part of the adventure is a massive attack on the town that the PC’s have just liberated. It calls for multiple encounters that have the PC’s fighting different small skirmishes around the main battle. While this is cool I’d like to change it to have an actual mass battle. Unfortunately it’s not feasible to use the full combat rules in a mass battle like this (around 50+ enemies, similar number of defenders plus the PC’s) so I want to go back to D&D’s roots and use some wargaming rules for the battle.

My initial thoughts are to have each PC be placed in command of a small group of defenders and have them roll attacks and control movement for that group. I need to come up with some simple rules for what kinds of attacks each group can make and I plan on having the PC’s each give different bonuses to their group according to their class abilities, i.e. the Knight gives her group bonuses to Defense, the Ranger gives bonuses to ranged attack, the Paladin to melee attacks, etc.

Does anyone have some simple mass combat rules worked up for a 4e equivalent to a wargame? This encounter is probably a month away so I’ve got time to develop and plan for it and I’ll post the rules I come up with before it happens but I’d like to hear/read what others have come up with in regards to this.

Good gaming!

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